"I recently had a religious studies lesson where we talked about gender and the role it plays in modern society, having watched Emma Watson’s speech about gender equality the night before and agreed with everything she said, I was disappointed by how ignorant some of the other boys in my class were (I attend an independent, all boys school in Hertfordshire). I felt compelled to write down my views of gender equality, although I’m not sure how well they would be received by people at my school, I wanted to share it somehow, so here it is.
“If We Really Want Equality”
We’re lucky to live in a western world where women can speak out against stereotypes. It’s a privilege. Gender equality and feminism is not about “man-hating” or the idea of “female supremacy”. It is, by definition, the opposite. The definition of feminism is, “a person who believes in the social, political and economic equality of the sexes.” It’s pretty simple really, and if you believe in those things, then you’re a feminist. Feminism can also be interpreted as a woman owning her sexuality, in the same way men do, wearing clothes that make her feel good about herself, or that show off her body, not for the attention of men, without being called a slut and with freedom from the threat of rape, because she wants to.
Recently we’ve been hearing about what it means to be “masculine” and what it means to be “feminine”. It means nothing, barring biological differences. By perceiving these two words as anything other than the description of a human’s genitalia, we perpetuate a stereotype which is nothing but harmful to all of us. By using words such as “girly” or “manly” we inadvertently buy into gender stereotyping whether we like it or not.
We live the gender stereotype without realising it, we have been born with it, we played with toys designed for our genders, we go to schools which are segregated, we play sports which other genders do not, and it takes some mindfulness for many people to even acknowledge its existence and the injustice it entails for both genders. If we want equality, it will take more effort than paying women the same as men, or giving women equal opportunities to men.
If we really want equality we must all make an active decision to abandon phrases such as “what it means to be masculine” and the like. If we really want equality we must try our best to ignore gender and stop competing with one another. We must stop comparing ourselves to each other, particularly other people of the same gender, because that leaves us with a feeling of insecurity and self doubt.
We must stop pressuring each other to fit with this stereotype which more often than not leaves us feeling repressed and unable to express ourselves. And most of all, if we really want equality, we need to stop caring. Stop caring about gender, stop caring about another person’s sexual preference, stop caring about how far someone fits in with the stereotype and stop caring, most of all, about how much we fit this stereotype, we must not let gender define us."
Ed Holtom

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Wassily Kandinsky, “Tanzkurven: Zu den Tänzen der Palucca,” Das Kunstblatt, Potsdam, vol. 10, no. 3 (1926)

Wassily Kandinsky, “Tanzkurven: Zu den Tänzen der Palucca,” Das Kunstblatt, Potsdam, vol. 10, no. 3 (1926)

(Source: theloudest--minds, via mudwerks)

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fyeahwomenartists:

Ruth Duckworth

(Source: karandasheva)

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(Source: ulle69)

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(Source: ulle69)

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"if you consider a woman
less pure after you’ve touched her
maybe you should take a look at your hands"

(via susiesantana)

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(Source: ulle69)

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Duggie Fileds, 1976

Duggie Fileds, 1976

(Source: aqqindex, via blue-voids)

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User 632 is an installation that stores the behavior of the people who look at it by monitoring them in return. It wants to know when and how a person passes by or if they stop on the way.

All data is being tracked and displayed publicly. Passers-by are stored as an anonymous number without any hints to their identities. Whoever comes to close to the camera though will be stored with a photograph next to their id.

The installation is made up of three Kinect depth cameras that constantly look for movements which are then reduced to a simple directional line in space. When a visitor enters a specific area, the algorithm is looking for a face. As soon as one is found a countdown appears that shows the time until a photo is taken automatically. At the same time the time a user is in the visible area is stored.

This data (time, path and eventually image) are stored in a database, interpreted and displayed as real-time statistics.

Link

(via 7knotwind)

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Israel: “Color and texture in the Dead Sea,” writes photographer Doron Nissim.

Israel: “Color and texture in the Dead Sea,” writes photographer Doron Nissim.

(Source: naturalsceneries, via sonicteeth)

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Piero Fornasetti’s Iconic  Eye

Piero Fornasetti’s Iconic  Eye

(Source: givemesomesoma, via mudwerks)

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India Mahdavi - The Gallery at Sketch [London, 2014]

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“Chameleon”

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12/27/2012
parallel

12/27/2012

parallel

(via ductility)

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John Baldessari

(Source: fleurlungs, via oneforeverywish)

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